Advocacy – check out some current projects that are in works:

Pikeview Quarry and Bike Park – reclamation is underway, when it’s signed off by the state of Colorado Department of Mining and Reclamation, it will be offered for donation to the city of Colorado Springs. Location.

Blodgett Open Space. Master plan process coming up in early 2023. Send us your suggestions! Location.

Forest Lakes New trail adjacent to Mt Hermann area south of Monument. Location .

Concrete Coyote – the physical location of our friends at Concrete Couch, with new trails through a partnership with MedWheel. Location.

Coleman Park Master plan process open now. Location.

Jones Park .The USFS NEPA final assessment for Bear Creek was published in 2013. The property is now owned by El Paso County and we’re working with partners to advance the master plan including trails, for this area. Location.

TOPS issue click to read the language that will be on the April 2023 ballot

OPPI – the Outdoor Pikes Peak Initiative. A regional planning process to address recreation and conservation.

Waldo Canyon. Re-imagine Waldo is complete and was a planning process outside the USFS normal processes. More work and USFS processes are ahead of us, with uncertain timelines. Location

Fountain Valley School – MedWheel is finalizing a trail plan for a race course on campus that will support many levels of racing, including high school and middle school events. Location

Mesa Res #2 Open Space and Uintah Bluffs – Bristol School trail – details coming soon. Location.

Cresta bike park now open. Location.


Since 1991, MedWheel has advocated for the rights of mountain bikers and trail users on public lands in the Pike Peak Region. We attend public meetings with all landowners, provide trail suggestions and talking points for master plans, build relationships with land managers & partners, and keep tabs on public land decision-making processes.

When we are ready to hold a Trail Love volunteer dig day, the MedWheel team has already spent months advocating for the new trails and hours preparing the trail layout. Often we work on long term projects that take years to develop and required consistent engagement with land managers over time.

Master Planning Processes

In our region, trails on public land are almost always subject to lengthy master planning processes. Why? Land managers have a responsibility to ensure safety for users and longevity of a public resource, even before considering recreational opportunities. When it’s time to consider recreation on public land, the needs of all rec users must be fairly evaluated, and all stakeholders must have their chance to share their preferences. Nearly always there is a substantial opportunity for public input, and that’s where we need to speak together for more trails. Once a master plan is made, it might take years to implement. The planning processes typically don’t include money for implementation but are a balanced community vision for a property or space. Raising funds for approved trails is often needed.

Some examples of Master Plan Processes in which MedWheel has participated on behalf of trail users include the 2014 city of Colorado Springs Parks System Master Plan, the 2016 Manitou Springs Parks, Open Space and Trails (POST) plan, individual plans such as Ute, Austin Bluffs-Pulpit Rock, North Cheyenne Canyon, Red Rock Canyon , Stratton. and many others.